MTHFR

Ray Peat supplement information.

Re: MTHFR

Unread postby iLoveSugar » Tue Nov 05, 2013 10:15 pm

My alternative MD wants me to go on liposomal glutathione. I was thinking about giving it a go. What do you take? Link? I have all sorts of health issues.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby Rinave » Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:17 pm

iLoveSugar,
my doctor orders mine from a compounding pharmacy and it is liquid glutathione. The pharmacy is Moses Lake Professional Pharmacy in Washington.

I heard that liposomal glutathione is also good. A lot of supplements are not that good and don't raise the glutathione level in the body.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby iLoveSugar » Wed Nov 06, 2013 12:27 am

Rinave wrote:iLoveSugar,
my doctor orders mine from a compounding pharmacy and it is liquid glutathione. The pharmacy is Moses Lake Professional Pharmacy in Washington.

I heard that liposomal glutathione is also good. A lot of supplements are not that good and don't raise the glutathione level in the body.


Do you feel great improvement with it?
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby Rinave » Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:43 pm

@ilovesugar
Sorry I didn't see your question before. My hubby had surgery
And I have been super busy.
I do feel very good with the nebulized glutathione.
It is actually the only thing that helps me. I breathe better
I have more energy. And as far as I know it is a powerful
Detoxifier.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby jag2594 » Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:50 am

Jib wrote:I was diagnosed months ago as compound heterozygous for two mutations of the MTHFR gene -- C677T and A1298C.

I've been taking a prescription called Deplin, which is the converted form of folic acid, L-methylfolate. I break the tablets in half and take 7.5mg a day. In addition, I've been taking 2.5mg of sublingual methylcobalamin and 12.5-25mg of P-5-P every day.

I found that even 1mg of methylcobalamin was messing me up. It would make me feel tired and sluggish and groggy and depressed. It seems like I was overmethylating and my body was getting overwhelmed by that. I seemed to be able to handle 500mcg okay although it still was a tiny bit iffy.

Interestingly, over the past couple weeks, since I started taking 500mg of niacinamide in the morning and 500mg again in the late afternoon, I've been able to take 2.5mg of methylcobalamin with no noticeably adverse effects. I remember reading on mthfr.net that niacin can act as a methyl 'sponge' that soaks up excess methyl groups.

Dr. Ben from mthfr.net seems to very rarely if ever recommend Deplin, since he seems to be a fan of using the lowest dose that gets results. I'd agree with that. I get a prescription though and my psychiatrist wanted me to take 15mg because that's what worked in studies on depression, and I wasn't able to get him to prescribe me the 7.5mg tablets which I could've broken up into 3.25mg tablets. So I've been stuck with 7.5mg, although I do have to admit that it does seem to work. When I've stopped taking it for a week or two I definitely notice my suicidal depression coming back full force.

Anyway, here's an interesting bit on overmethylation, undermethylation, and niacin:

http://mthfr.net/overmethylation-and-un ... 012/06/27/

...

The only issue is the doctor did not realize how effective methylation is at supporting neurotransmitters and thyroid hormone production.

So what happened is the gentleman decided to skip his methylfolate and methylcobalamin dose, take a lot of niacin (which is a methyl ‘sponge’) and he immediately tanked his methyl groups which caused symptoms of undermethylation.

Then, upon restarting the methylfolate and methylcobalamin, and maintaining his current dosage of medications, he felt great for a few hours.

Then anxiety hit due to excessive neurotransmitter production and likely thyroid hormone production.

So – in order to quiet those symptoms, I told him about how niacin works and how to take it and his anxiety decreased almost immediately.

"Nicotinic acid (Niacin USP) requires SAMe to be metabolized. SAMe is a major methyl donor. Thus, when one consumes niacin, SAMe gets used up and methyl donors drop. Thereby excessive methylation goes away.

Nicotinic acid is a cofactor for the COMT enzyme. This enzyme helps breakdown norepinephrine and epinephrine – and estrogen. These are all commonly elevated in those with anxiety. Since the COMT enzyme sped up, the breakdown of these occurred faster.


Does anyone else here have any mutations of the MTHFR gene? Given how important methylation is, it seems like it would be a good topic to cover in light of Ray Peat's research, although I've read next to nothing from Peat or any of his followers about the MTHFR gene mutations.


Ray Peat doesn't give much way to the genetic determinism in todays medical culture. He believes in a lamarckian ideology. What were you symptoms before finding out of the gene mutation.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby BingDing » Sat Dec 14, 2013 6:16 pm

A minor note to this thread but I found an activated Folate supplement made by "Doctor's Best", available at The Vitamin Shoppe. The added ingredients seem OK, one can open up the capsule if desired.

I decided against the activated B complex Wilfrid posted because of the 50 mg of B6. Too much B6 can cause vivid dreams, not something I need more of. Charlie started a thread about it here

Otherwise I'm doing good with niacinimide, B1, and methyl B12, still need to get the activated form of B6 and B2.

And IMHO, this forum does RP fair well by mentioning practitioners who can spot fads and BS in the medical/pharmaceutical industrial complex. Nice!
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby BaconBits » Fri Dec 27, 2013 5:33 pm

How many people have this genetic mutation? Has anybody seen the studies?
The prevalence of at least one defective gene for making choline from methione was in american studies like 80% and thats huge. Now choline and methionine is the beggining of the methylation cycle and folate and b-12 are near the end of this cycle.

But the question arises, nowhere in our foods is there any folic acid or cyanocobalamin. The enzymes for metabolising folic acid seem to only have the capacity for 200mcg at a single dose, thats mean that if you dont split in that doses you are not getting the maximum benefit. Also the way body detoxifies cyanide is by bounding it to methyl or adenosyl b-12 and making its own cyanocbalamin that you pee out??

But the body seems to have a plan B always. Betain can spare folate and B-12.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby BingDing » Fri Dec 27, 2013 6:38 pm

BaconBits, are you saying that folate should be taken more than once a day? I have been taking B complex 3-4 times a day since they are water soluble, is that good?

Chris Masterjohn has a series of articles about choline, link. He thinks that it is likely the recommended 550 mg/day for men is low. Looking at my diet I am getting nowhere near that.

After reading more about it, it appears betaine and choline can lower homocysteine, C reactive protein, and TNF alpha, all of which would be good things, I think.

I've recently added 500 mg betaine anhydrous and 250 mg choline bitartrate to my B vitamin mix and seem to get a very good response as far as energy and mood improvement. For example, this week I handled a cycle of action much as when I was younger- that is, I can start a task, work on it, and finish it, as opposed to leaving it half done for weeks or never even starting it.

Does keeping methionine intake down and supplementing betaine and choline along with the B vitamins make sense?

All I've found in RP's writing is about over methylation of DNA and I didn't understand it.

Thanks
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby BaconBits » Sat Dec 28, 2013 7:43 am

Yea, I read the Chris Mastrjohn articles. Thing is, that this methylation is extremely complicated. Did you read about the animal studies where the animals were feed a diet deficient in copper but more than enough choline and other nutrients but they got fatty liver. When copper was given everything normalized. Also estrogen was protective even when choline and methionine were deficient in women. You cannot use a reductionistic or linear logic to understand it, at least it seems.
It would be interesting how progesterone or pregnenolone or T3 or T3 affect this?

Betain is somehow universal because can spare all the elements in methylation cycle, from methione, choline, to folate and B-12. Betain is trymethylglycine which is kind of methylated glycine? Body can also make pangamic acid or vitamin b15 out of it.

I would be happy to find some more articles on methylaton if you know of any.
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Re: MTHFR

Unread postby Jib » Sun Jan 05, 2014 11:10 am

jag2594 wrote:Ray Peat doesn't give much way to the genetic determinism in todays medical culture. He believes in a lamarckian ideology. What were you symptoms before finding out of the gene mutation.


L-methylfolate and other activated B-vitamins probably have specific actions in the body regardless of the presence of genetic mutations or not. It would probably be helpful to study them outside the context of the genetic mutation, although the genetic mutation is what's garnered methylfolate and other activated B-vitamins so much attention lately.

My symptoms before knowing about the genetic mutation were about 10 years of chronic anxiety, major depression, suicidal ideation, mood swings, insomnia and digestive problems (constipation, diarrhea, acid reflux, difficulty swallowing, poor appetite). They've persisted after I started taking L-methylfolate, but I did notice that in about a week of taking 7.5mg of it a day the symptoms weren't nearly as bad as they used to be.

Probably the most notable thing I experienced was the reduction in outbursts of anger. I used to have outbursts pretty frequently but since I started the L-methylfolate the incidents of that have dropped significantly.

It's hard to know how much I can attribute to the L-methylfolate, but I notice that when I've forgotten to take it for a week or two I tend to get extremely depressed and suicidal and feel a lot more irritable. Part of that could be that it throws me off just enough to make me stop taking care of myself, e.g., eating plenty of calories from sugar and saturated fat, getting enough protein, eating throughout the day and getting enough sleep, and then the cumulative effect of neglecting those things leads me into a downward spiral.

The therapeutic effect of L-methylfolate, mutation or not, is interesting to me, and I wonder how well it could fit into the context of energy production in the body, right alongside other B-vitamins like P-5-P and niacinamide.
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